Jimmy Carter Statement on Death of Hugo Chavez

Jimmy Carter Statement on Death of Hugo Chavez.

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Liberty Books Blog

dawnbooksandauthors | 1 day ago

Reviewed by Asif Farrukhi

A rose is a rose is a rose, wrote Gertrude Stein and became famous for having done so. If this circular sentence completes its sense with a rose being declared a rose thrice, then the carrot comes only two times in the title of Zia Mohyeddin’s delightful collection of essays, subtitled “Memories and Reflections.” The carrot comes from Chekhov and not Stein. In the essay after which the book is named, Mohyeddin says that “Life today is a carrot,” and then explains this as a reference, if not a tribute, to the Russian master:

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Liberty Books Blog

Source: Business Week
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Somewhere in Beijing there must be an incinerator for burning reports from outsiders telling China’s leaders what to do. In February the World Bank, in cooperation with an arm of the Chinese government, issued a report called China 2030 that included this gem: “Where contract disputes arise … the disputants should have access not only to legal recourse but also to a transparent and effective judicial system that imparts justice without fear or favor.” It’s hard to imagine President Hu Jintao slapping his forehead in wonderment upon reading this: “But of course! Why didn’t we think of that? Stop the theft of intellectual property at once!”

As silly as it is, the “ignorance hypothesis”—the assumption that people in power would do right by their citizens if only they knew better—“still rules supreme among most economists and in Western policy-making circles,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology economist Daron Acemoglu and Harvard…

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Liberty Books Blog

It had more betrayals, affairs, alliances and scheming than a soap opera.

Now the BBC is to turn best-selling novel Wolf Hall, which laid bare the vicious realities of the court of Henry VIII, into a mini-series.

The six-part adaptation will be based on Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize winning bestseller, and her follow-up Bring Up The Bodies.

Set in England in the 1520s, it will show a nation on the brink of disaster and civil war because the ageing king has no male heir.

The book follows Thomas Cromwell who came from humble beginnings as the son of a brutal blacksmith to become chief minister of King Henry VIII of England

A self-confessed ‘ruffian’ in his younger days, Cromwell rose out of the slums of Putney to become a mercenary, merchant and member of Parliament and eventually the right hand of the king, helping Henry VIII get his marriage to Queen…

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Liberty Books Blog

It had more betrayals, affairs, alliances and scheming than a soap opera.

Now the BBC is to turn best-selling novel Wolf Hall, which laid bare the vicious realities of the court of Henry VIII, into a mini-series.

The six-part adaptation will be based on Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize winning bestseller, and her follow-up Bring Up The Bodies.

Set in England in the 1520s, it will show a nation on the brink of disaster and civil war because the ageing king has no male heir.

The book follows Thomas Cromwell who came from humble beginnings as the son of a brutal blacksmith to become chief minister of King Henry VIII of England

A self-confessed ‘ruffian’ in his younger days, Cromwell rose out of the slums of Putney to become a mercenary, merchant and member of Parliament and eventually the right hand of the king, helping Henry VIII get his marriage to Queen…

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Liberty Books Blog

By Noman Ansari

Published: August 26, 2012
 

The book is classified as erotic fiction, where I am sure the word ‘erotic’ is used in the loosest sense of the word. PHOTO: PUBLICITY

Which series has sold over 40 million copies worldwide and overtaken Harry Potter as well as The Da Vinci Code to become the fastest selling paperback in countries like the United Kingdom? Fifty Shades of Grey, of course.

The book is classified as erotic fiction, where I am sure the word ‘erotic’ is used in the loosest sense of the word. If erotic passages are meant to induce an almost impossible combination of disbelief, cringing and inadvertent hilarity then, by all means, Fifty Shades of Grey is the most erotic novel ever written. Frankly, until now, I did not think it was possible to wince, laugh, and grind my teeth at same time.

There is also…

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Reading is not just another leisurely activity or a way of brushing up your literacy skills and factual knowledge – it acts as a tonic for the brain too.

Neuroscientist Susan Greenfield suggests that reading helps to expand attention spans in kids. “Stories have a beginning, a middle and an end – a structure that encourages our brains to think in sequence, to link cause, effect and significance,” she says.

“It is essential to learn this skill as a small child, while the brain has more plasticity, which is why it’s so important for parents to read to their children. The more we do it, the better we get at it,” Greenfield added.

Reading can enrich our relationships by increasing our understanding of other cultures and helping us learn to empathise, the Daily Mail reports.

“In a computer game, you might have to rescue a princess, but you don’t care…

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